There are many touch points for a package before reaching your end customer, so make sure the packaging holds up through all of these touchpoints.

The external packaging should only act as a barrier to protect the internal goods from weather and damage during transit. It's the internal packaging that is the most crucial protection barrier.

If repackaging is required during transit, this will cause extended delays to your end customer. It will also void you of any transit protection coverage you may have paid for. 

Here are some key tips to follow to ensure things reach your end customer safe and intact!

 

mceclip2.png Key tips for packaging.  

  • Choose well. Choose strong, fitting and durable packaging based on product type not journey type.
  • Void fill. Don't leave dead space in the satchel or carton. 
  • Layer internally. Protect your items as much as possible internally, the more protective layers the better.
  • Don't tape items together. Boxes and items should not be taped together. Each individual item requires it's own shipping label. Items that have been taped together will not be covered in the event it comes apart and goes missing.
  • Don't rely on fragile stickers. Goods are handled manually very minimally, so make sure your packaging does the work don't rely on fragile stickers as machines don't capture these.
  • Add Shippit Transit Protection. Cover yourself for those dissapointing scenarios.

 

 

Packaging Guidelines

NOTE: these are guidelines only and in order to be considered 'sufficient packaging' you must be able to show that care has been taken in order to protect the goods both internally and externally.

 

Liquids
  • paints
  • oils
  • creams
  • wine & alcohol
  • beverages
  • any liquid

Internal:

  • tape lids shut securely if not properly sealed or the lid can unscrew
  • place loose containers into plastic wrap/bag and securely tightly with waterproof tape
  • use strong separation inserts to divide the box into cells for each item
  • void fill empty space in the outer carton

External:

  • Use strong corrugated boxes where possible
  • tape the box shut with waterproof tape to avoid leakage
  • label as liquids and this side up
Fragile 
  • glass, mirrors
  • ceramics
  • glass homewares
  • wood homewares
  • ceramic homewares
  • wood furniture
  • delicate furniture
  • delicate goods
  • antiques
  • artwork, canvases
  • breakables

Internal: 

  • pad/wrap each internal item separately using bubble wrap, protective film, or double-wall cardboard sheets. 
  • void fill to avoid movement with foam peanuts, airbag cushioning or something of sorts
  • strong triple-layer cardboard or plastic corner protectors
  • cover in final layer of bubble wrap or protective film
  • 2" thick styrofoam placed around edging allowing 5cm between the contents and outer packaging
  • artwork or canvases should be placed in either a cylindrical case, or flat wooden casing dependant on material requirements.

External packaging:

  • double-ply cardboard box/carton
  • strong, durable waterproof tape
  • label as fragile or fragile tape

Heavy Goods & Homewares

  • marble
  • porcelain
  • ceramic tiles
  • heavy furniture 
  • heavy homewares

Internal packaging:

  • pad/wrap each internal item separately using bubble wrap, protective film, or double-wall cardboard sheets. 
  • use same-sized splints in between pieces and wrap tightly using packaging tape to secure in place
  • support each piece or surface evenly. Do not use waded paper as this creates an uneven surface.
  • use corner protectors are designed to  support heavy goods
  • packaged goods should be encased in strong wooden casing or finaly protective layer 
  • add a 2” thick shock absorbing material around edges such as foam. 

External packaging:

  • encase in wooden casing where possible
  • if over 30kg the item should be palletised or place on skid

Pallets

  • goods over 30kg that require tail-lift
  • bulk palletised freight
  • any goods placed on skids or pallets
  • The standard pallet size in Australia is 1.165m x 1.165m and can usually hold a weight limit of up to 2000kg. However, carriers each have their own restrictions so be sure to check this before you start shipping.
  • Although not ideal, it is also possible to place wider and higher items on pallets; this is called an 'oversized pallet'. A maximum width of 2m and height of 1.5m is generally accepted but again, it's essential to check carrier restrictions.
  • Bulk palletised freight that is stackable should be wrapped with plastic.
  • Stackable pallets are most ideal to maximise capacity within the truck. It also helps them to avoid those not-so-fun games of tetris which are time consuming for the driver, and will result in surcharges for the sender.
  • Goods over 30kg should generally be placed on a pallet to avoid carrier surcharges if they have to palletise it for you.
  • Stack within the dimensions of the pallet and don't stack pallets too high.
  • Keep pallets level & stackable. Carriers will not accept pallets with over-hanging goods and you will have to pay a surcharge if your pallet isn’t stackable. 
  • Stretch wrap your pallets. Use pallet wrap or at least two straps from both sides to hold items in place. Strapping and wrapping should include the pallet itself.
  • Label pallets clearly. Affix to the side, not the top as another pallet may be stacked on top of yours.

 

 

mceclip2.png Satchels.

Satchels are a very cost-effective option, just remember a few things.

  • No fragile, sharps, or liquids. These are not suitable to travel in a satchel, use carton instead.
  • Don't over pack. Trying to fit too much in a satchel might cause it too burst open during transit which means the contents may get lost. 
  • Seal shut securely. Fold over the satchel if the cnotents don't fill the entire satchel space. Using extra tape will ensure any un-stuck folds don't get stuck to anything else and tear open.

 

mceclip2.png Boxes and Cartons.

The carton is an external barrier only and needs to be strong and durable to hold up during travel. Remember, adequate internal packaging is resposible for protecting what's inside.

  • Don't overload. Make sure the carton strong enough to carry the weight of the goods inside.
  • Choose the right size. As you're charged for the greater of actual or volumetric weight, try not to leave any dead space inside the carton.
  • Void fill. Pack dead space is filled with a void-fill material such as bubble wrap, newspaper, or air pillows to stop things from moving around inside.
  • Seal shut securely. Use durable and water-resistant tape incase the box comes into contact with wet weather.
  • Label each box. Don't tape boxes together as each individual box requires it's own label and is measured based on cubic size.

 

mceclip2.png Fragile Items.

When sending fragile items it's absolutely crucial to ensure the goods are sufficiently packaged. Goods will travel through several automatic sortation devices and machines can't read fragile labels. Below is a non exhaustive list of guidelines to guide you with packaging examples.

If you're unsure, please speak with our support team or your Shippit account manager.

 

 

mceclip2.png Pallets and Heavy Goods.

You'll be required to palletise heavy and bulky goods as these can't be manually handled. Pallets require a forklift when handling goods and a special tail-lift vehicle to transport the goods.

Goods over 30kg should be placed on a skid or pallet for the truck before arrival otherwise you will incur fees to have them palletise it for you.

Here are some tips for proper palletisation:

  • Stack within the dimensions of the pallet and don't stack pallets too high.
  • Keep pallets level & stackable. Carriers will not accept pallets with over-hanging goods and you will have to pay a surcharge if your pallet isn’t stackable. 
  • Stretch wrap your pallets. Use pallet wrap or at least two straps from both sides to hold items in place. Strapping and wrapping should include the pallet itself.
  • Label pallets clearly. Affix to the side, not the top as another pallet may be stacked on top of yours. 

 

 

mceclip2.png Labelling.

  • Label correctly. Remove any old labels and ensure the correct label can be read properly.
  • Don't cover or crease. No tape should placed over the barcodes as this will affect it being read. Packages will not be accepted if the label cannot be scanned. 
  • Dangerous goods. Ensure all DG are labelled correctly and signed off by a certified DG person. Do not ship DG with carriers that are not accepting of those DG.

 

 

Need supplies? We've got you covered!

Shipping supplies can be purchased directly from our supply store.

 

 

 

 

 

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